Nitrate Removal from Water

Treatment: Anion Exchange Water Softener (Countercurrent Regenerating)

image004A specialized type of Anion exchange water softener is used to remove nitrates. A water softener uses the principle of ion-exchange – in this case, anions – to remove nitrates from raw water. The equipment contains a “bed” of softening material known as ‘resin’ through which the untreated water flows. Although the anion softener looks the same on the outside, this unit is very different from a standard water softener. As water passes through the resin, the nitrates in the water attach themselves to this material. This ion-exchange process occurs literally billions of times during the softening process. Weekly automatic regeneration, or recharging, is necessary. The unit is set to automatically perform this regeneration as needed, based on water usage. To recharge the resin, it must be rinsed with a rich brine solution (Sodium Chloride – salt). This washes the nitrates out of the resin and replaces them with chloride, so the resin is once again ready to exchange ions to remove more nitrates. During the recharging cycle, the unit is also backwashed. Reversing the normal flow of water also serves to remove any turbidity and sediment, which may have accumulated during the softening process due to the filtering action of the ion exchange material.  Backwashing also loosens and fluffs up the bed of resin. Countercurrent regenerating water softeners add the salt against the service flow, and use significantly less salt than traditional water softeners. Our softeners are controlled using Clack® WS-1 control heads, which offer the option of either metered “demand initiated regeneration” or the more traditional “timed” regeneration.

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